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Marlow

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Design Achievement - Coming out of the Great Recession and into Summer 2010, Oyster Development Corp. acquired a plot of land on San Francisco’s busy Van Ness Avenue. This would be the first condominium land sale in roughly two years, and, bucking the trend, a development planned outside the burgeoning, up-and-coming South of Market area. Marlow sits at the intersection of three established neighborhoods and was built to accommodate the changing needs of the city’s residents. DLR Group|KwanHenmi’s design embraces a unitized vocabulary that gives each unit has a distinct identity. The façade presents a collection of units rather than an array of windows in a plane. These “boxed windows” are paired with recesses that accommodate a deck for each unit and the entire assembly is woven together by vertical elements connecting the building’s mid-section to its base. The unitized vocabulary is eroded at the upper levels to reduce the apparent mass of the building and to give it a distinct apogee.
 
Scope Summary - Marlow is an eight-story, multi-family development, one of the first after a recession that virtually shut down all new residential projects in San Francisco. It sits at the corner of Van Ness Avenue and Clay Street in a transitional neighborhood close to the highly sought-after Nob Hill. The project consists of 98 units in 2 buildings—one 8-story building with 1- and 2-bedroom units and one 4-story building with 3 townhouses—and encloses a large courtyard. It is a high density, low energy consumption structure with a Walk Score of 98, proximity to multiple transit lines, and roughly 5,000 SF of retail space. The neighborhood serves an economically diverse community and fifteen units within the project are subsidized under the San Francisco's Below Market Rate Ownership Program, which helps to provide affordable housing for lower- or middle-income households. DLR Group|KwanHenmi provided architecture and construction administration services.

Awards & Recognition

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  • Design Award

    American Institute of Architects (AIA) San Francisco

Marlow